Charles Louis Davis and Samuel Wesley Thompson DVM Foundation

For the Advancement of Veterinary and Comparative Pathology

info@cldavis.org | Phone: 847-367-4359 | Fax: 847-247-1869
  • 25th Annual Descriptive Veterinary Pathology Course

    Learn how to describe gross and microscopic lesions in a variety of major organs in numerous animal species.

  • 43rd Annual Gross Pathology Review Course

    Learn to identify common diseases in a wide variety of species from salient diagnostic features and to form appropriate morphologic and differential diagnoses.

  • 2016 POLA Course

    Learn to recognize and interpret of lesions in laboratory animals.

  • 26th Annual South Central Division Meeting

    Guest Lecture: Aquatic Animal Pathology; Fish, Invertebrates, and Aquaculture Perspectives by Wes Baumgartner, DVM, PhD, DACVP, Mississippi State University

  • 2016 ASVCP Descriptive Veterinary Pathology Course

    The course was held in Australia at The University of Queensland Gatton Campus.

  • 25th Annual South Central Division Meeting

    The Meeting was held at the Texas A&M University Galveston Campus on October 2, 2015.

  • 25th Annual South Central Division Meeting

    The Meeting was held at the Texas A&M University Galveston Campus on October 2, 2015.

  • Southcentral Division

    The Fondation's Southcentral Division meting is well-known for its outstanding social events.

***We are currently having problems with our bookstore, and we are sorry for the inconvenience.
Please call the Main Office at 847-367-4359 to place all orders, and they will be shipped immediately.
This problem should be resolved within the month.***

Most Requested Publications

We are currently having problems with our bookstore, and we are sorry for the inconvenience. Please call the Main Office at 847-367-4359 to place all orders, and they will be shipped immediately. This problem should be resolved within the month.

CL Davis Diagnostic Exercises

The main goal of these Diagnostic Exercises is to provide interesting cases, focusing on the gross pathological lesions and associated histopathologic or cytologic findings. This material can be of great use for veterinary students, in-training pathologists, and ACVP diplomates alike.

There will be one contribution per month of the year; anyone may contribute. To do so, please contact Dr. Vinicius Carreira at vinicius.carreira@gmail.com to identify a convenient date for your submission and to receive templates to be used. Spots will be filled out on a first-come first-served basis.

Exercise Animal Thumbnail Answer
Click here for case history Click here for case synopsis

Twitter Feed - @cldavis_vetpath

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Montaser Elhawary shared KevinMD.com's How to read your pathology report! This is what you need to k... to the group: C.L. Davis and S.W. Thompson DVM Foundation.

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How to read your pathology report! This is what you need to know. Created by the College of American Pathologists. Uploaded with permission.

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Thanks Fabio Del Piero for your letter to the Vet path Editor about the article "The Diagnosis of West Nile Virus Infection in Horses": It is under these situations I ask myself "what can you trust when you are reading a scientific paper". You want to think that when something is published in a journal such as the Veterinary Pathology, there has been competent(s) reviewers with a good insight in the topic that can screen for possible pitfalts of a study. No study is perfect, but it is important that autors indicate themselfs the pitfalts of their studies in the papers. I appreciate that still some take from their time to report about their concerns about some of the contents of papers.
"This letter refers to the Veterinary Pathology brief communication “West Nile Virus Infection in Horses: Detection by Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, and ELISA” by Toplu et al.5 The authors attempt to describe the clinicopathologic findings in naturally occurring West Nile virus (WNV) infection in horses. WNV was diagnosed in a foal by immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques, and the presence of WNV antibodies was detected in 5 other horses with clinical signs suggestive of WNV infection. The foal was the only animal that received a complete postmortem and histological examination. The authors indicate that the clinical signs were “consistent” with West Nile virus infection. Clinical signs described are not specific since several other diseases may reveal with the same clinical presentation. In the method for immunohistochemistry they refer to a fluorescence antibody technique, but the represented image (Figure 3) is not of such technique. Instead, it depicts an indirect peroxidase DAB technique with brown staining. This immunohistochemical image consists of a cerebral blood vessel with endothelial and periendothelial staining; however, several other surrounding cells are labeled as well. West Nile flavivirus in horses is not characterized by frequent and abundant staining and is not characterized by the endothelial infection seen in avian species. In the image there is also evidence of nuclear staining although RNA flavivirus infection is not characterized by nuclear infection. In Figure 2, which represents the in situ hybridization (ISH) localization of the flavivirus nucleic acid, as also observed in the IHC viral detection image, all the cells types in the field are labeled, with extension of the staining almost diffusely into the neuropil without clear cut localization in fibers or cytoplasm. In summary, WNV IHC, and ISH stain appearance, distribution, and localization in this manuscript suggest nonspecific staining. The authors also describe that the foal is affected by lymphadenomegaly, lymphoid tissue necrosis, and hepatocellular necrosis. These are all lesions that do not occur with an equine WNV infection in horses. The presence of these lesions and the dubious IHC and ISH staining suggest that this foal was affected by another, perhaps more significant, condition and that WNV was not necessarily a significant cause of disease in this foal if present at all (no confirmatory polymerase chain reaction [PCR] was performed). Regarding the other horses, it seems that we will never know for sure either if WNV was the cause of their disease since the necropsy findings were not reported and the antibody of the competitive ELISA kit used for the detection of anti-pr-E antibodies cross-reacts with Japanese Encephalitis viruses and the tick-borne encephalitis virus. The preferred way for the postmortem diagnosis of West Nile virus infection in mammals is PCR testing of brainstem tissue along with the histologic identification of rhombencephalomyelitis with perivascular lymphohistiocytic cuffs, sparse phagocytic glial nodules, and ring hemorrhages. The intralesional viral antigen will be scant and contained in the cytoplasm of a few neurons, nerve fibers, and small aggregates of glial cells. In some cases numerous sections (sometimes more than 10) will have to be processed to detect the viral antigen. Combination of diagnostic tests is very often the best approach to a diagnosis and caution should be used in the interpretation of IHC and ISH.1⇓⇓–4,6
F. Del Piero
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As we overhaul the JPC's VSPO/WSC server, we are interested in finding out about the problems that folks are having. If you encounter errors, please message me here on FB or email me at bruce.h.williams12.civ@mail.mil. Please be specific with regard to the problems so we can hopefully address and fix them. ... See moreSee less